Funniest Headline Ever

I’ve got a whole backlog of stuff I’m working on; hence the link madness.

Maybe it wasn’t the funniest EVER, but it was funny: Good Versus Wiivil.

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14 Comments

  1. imweasel said,

    June 20, 2007 at 7:52 pm

    “I have to admit, there does seem to be a rather fine line crossed when, instead of jamming a combination of buttons, you have to physically act out the motion of stabbing someone with a knife. Practice makes perfect? I’m not so sure I’d want my kid to find out.

    — Posted by Mikey”

    I find this comment most amusing.

    How about ‘Mikey’ not buying his kid a wii? Or any other console gaming platform that produces content he doesn’t like?

    It’s amazing simple…

  2. Staryx said,

    June 20, 2007 at 8:02 pm

    From the article, “provides far too much reality for the the core audience of video gamers — the under 18 set.”

    Um… What?

    I’m sorry, I can’t take anyone seriously when they go with the “Video Games are for kids” route.

  3. Staryx said,

    June 20, 2007 at 8:06 pm

    Wow, Mikey’s a moron. What’s to prevent your kids from practicing a stabbing motion with, oh, say a pencil? A butterknife? A spoon? A stick? Their kid brother? Seriously, does becoming a parent remove the part of your brain that allows rational and logical thought?

  4. Michelle D'israeli said,

    June 20, 2007 at 8:25 pm

    Staryx, or even a stabby thing, like a knife, or a chainsaw (kiddie size, ‘my first chainsaw’, if you will)?

    Last I knew, parents tended to not padlock away knives, as a rule, and few invest in blade locks and proper cutlery safes. Many parents even allow them to be taken out of the eating range and into such places as the lounge or their bedroom? It’s utterly shocking!

  5. GLEN said,

    June 21, 2007 at 9:56 am

    WHAT WRONG WITH YOU PEOPLE

  6. Foxeye said,

    June 21, 2007 at 12:08 pm

    If parents are so concerned about the mental wellbeing of impressionable children, they should turn off the fracking tv/console. It’s like demanding that candy bar makers take the caramel out of chocolate bars because it has too much sugar. I love gaming, but if a kid is spending enough time playing games that a violent game puts their behavior at risk, then there is already a bigger problem. “Impressionable” minds can be better served elsewhere.

  7. Ellisa said,

    June 21, 2007 at 1:38 pm

    I think the “knife, pencil, etc” analogy fails to stand up. Sure, a kid can practice stabbing with lots of things. But independent play is not going to reinforce, nor reward their behavior, unlike the game which I’m sure gives players incentive and reward for it. Additionally, practicing a stabbing action on air or a box of tissues or whatever is not the same as getting the visual feedback of actually stabbing a person and seeing the results.

    I also have to comment on this – “How about ‘Mikey’ not buying his kid a wii?” If that is really how consumers respond, no wonder Nintendo doesn’t want the game in its lineup as is. Should they lose sales of their console over a single controversial game?

    Additionally, how many products self-modify to become more appealing to the masses? In a nod to the “take caramel out of candy bars,” comment, how about the cereal Sugar Smacks which changed its name to Honey Smacks for a while and then just Smacks? This was obviously done in response to a buying public that was hearing sugar might not be that great for us.

    From the point of view of someone with a wii AND a young child – We use the wii for family time, our 2 year old loves playing baseball with us. I don’t buy consoles based on the games made for them. I buy games based on the game.

    If we don’t buy Manhunt 2, it’s not because I’m scared my daughter is going to become a violent stabber because she either played it or saw us playing. More likely, I just don’t want her exposed to those images, nor do I find any entertainment value in pretending to stab people myself. If Nintendo chooses to keep games with questionable or controversial content out of their line-up, more power to them.

  8. Lahdeeda said,

    June 21, 2007 at 2:04 pm

    Wiivel… I love it…

    The comment about video games not being for children was true maybe five years ago, but the demographics of video game players are changing, and many companies recognize this, which is why there are some markets focused on family-friendly games. Now that the 25-35 year old gamers have children, they are introducing their children to games. Just as more women are playing games, more children are. My kids all play video games. It’s family entertainment.

    Wii is not marketed as just for adults, it’s marketed toward the whole family, so it makes sense they would not add this game. Many console games are marketed for the E rating, as well, so it’s not really all that surprising.

    This particular game is just excessive, and will probably get its Adult Only rating, which is fine, then adults that are over 18 can go enjoy themselves with it. But if you are a business, and you want to make money and actually sell your products, then you cater to the people who actually buy your products. Since many many families buy the Wii, they are a powerful consumer group. Also, think of the press. Wii doesn’t want to be known as the first product to ‘realistically recreate’ violent acts.

    As for violence in video games overall? Not a fan of excessive violence. We plan to buy a Wii, but if the games in their line up were similar to Manhunt? We wouldn’t bother. I agree with Ellisa (of course). I’m not buying Manhunt 2, but it’s because I don’t have any interest in seeing the excessive gore, and I don’t want my children to see it.

    In the end, it’s about the company’s personal philosophy, and who it is that buys their product. The majority rules in business, so if the majority of your consumers want Racing (Grand Theft Auto exempted) and Mario games, then that is what they will get.

  9. Khan said,

    June 21, 2007 at 2:33 pm

    Wiivils wobble, but they don’t fall down?

    *cough*

    Parent’s need to keep tabs on the games their kids are playing and be informed consumers about the things their kids want. (I.E: know that not all video games are kids games.) While I wouldn’t want to play the game myself, I’m ok with a company making such a game as long as it is marketed for what it is. If the game bothers you, don’t play it. Don’t let your kids play it. I don’t have kids, but Wii or not, that game wouldn’t be in my house.

    Personally, I like video games for kids more than tv (with going-outside-and-being-a-kid better than both). Video games are active entertainment. And with game consoles like Wii, it’s also mild exersize too.

  10. Kemor said,

    June 25, 2007 at 2:07 am

    Ellisa said:
    “If Nintendo chooses to keep games with questionable or controversial content out of their line-up, more power to them.”

    That’s more power to them and lots less to everyone else. Remove the right to choose if something is good for you or not and you’ll end up in a country you might not like (or you might, I wouldn’t).

    If the game is AO, why even bother talking about “if a kid would do this and that”? Why bother having ratings if parents don’t enforce them or check what their kids do?

    Man, I was never a console fan but seeing that the big 3s (nintendo, sony, microsoft) are now controlling what you can “play”, for your own safety of course, you’ll excuse me a second while I kiss my PC, my bloody games, my indie-slasher movies and my porn.

  11. Grimjakk said,

    June 26, 2007 at 11:10 pm

    It’s Nintendo’s business and their decision to make.

    Honestly, I couldn’t give a rats posterior about whether Rockstar makes games for the Wii. It’s not like it won’t be available on other platforms.

    My brother and sister’s families both bought Wii’s BECAUSE it didn’t have the overabundance of bang-splatter and jiggle-bounce you see on the X-Box, and I don’t think they’re alone.

    That’s actually a feature for a lot of folks.

  12. Tovin said,

    June 27, 2007 at 7:10 pm

    I don’t enjoy those types of games, so I don’t play them, but if people are so upset about it…….don’t buy the game. Don’t buy your kids the console, accessories, and every game that’s released for it.

    End of story.

  13. imweasel said,

    June 28, 2007 at 6:59 am

    “It’s Nintendo’s business and their decision to make.

    Honestly, I couldn’t give a rats posterior about whether Rockstar makes games for the Wii. It’s not like it won’t be available on other platforms.

    My brother and sister’s families both bought Wii’s BECAUSE it didn’t have the overabundance of bang-splatter and jiggle-bounce you see on the X-Box, and I don’t think they’re alone.

    That’s actually a feature for a lot of folks.”

    Ya. Heaven forbid someone actually have to take the responsibility of making choices for themselves, rather than someone doing it for them instead.

    That all aside, I can see the point. It’s hard NOT to be at least a little hypocritical about this issue.

    It’s just sad overall when folks ask ‘the powers that be’ to make these ‘moral’ decisions for them, rather than them having the backbone to make that decision themselves.

    I guess my opinion could waver over the fact if nintendo started releasing nothing but ‘adult’ games for wii as opposed to just a few titles.

  14. Grimjakk said,

    June 29, 2007 at 4:06 am

    “Heaven forbid someone actually have to take the responsibility of making choices for themselves, rather than someone doing it for them instead.”

    I’m confused by your comment… Didn’t WE make that decision when WE bought a Nintendo? No one is asking “someone” to make decisions for us and I don’t see any hypocrisy in recognizing that Nintendo has made “family-friendly” a marketing feature of their machine from the get-go. That reputation is worth money to them. It would be stupid of them to abandon that. I don’t see anything hypocritical about that, honestly.

    If I wanted to play an AO game, I’d buy one for the 360 or PC… or even my old PS2.


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